Effects of Broken Bones in Children

Fractures, which happen when bones break, can have different effects on adults and on children, whose bones are more flexible because they are otherwise still growing, according to the website of Crowe & Mulvey, LLP.

Adults have around 206 bones in their bodies, with the largest being the femur or thighbone, which makes it possible for people to engage in activities such as walking and jumping. The smallest bones in the body are called stapes, which are found in the middle ear of humans and other animals and which are responsible for the production of sound waves in the ear, making it possible for the person or the mammal to hear. Some bones are flat, like those inside one’s skull. Some have a cube shape, like those that make up one’s wrist. However, most of the bones in one’s body are called long bones, which are found inside one’s arms, legs, hands, and feet, which are responsible for mobility and flexibility.

One can find out that one has broken bones if he/she gets an X-ray of the affected bone area. On an X-ray, bones have a whitish appearance. However if a bone is broken, the bone will manifest as dark-colored.

Children are more susceptible to bone breakage because their bones are still growing. An example of a breakage is the growth plate fracture, which happens near the end of the bone where the growth occurs. An X-ray of a growth plate fracture can appear normal, because growth plates are made up of cartilage, not bone.

A buckle fracture is characterized by an irregularity in the bone, not an outright crack. On the other hand, a greenstick fracture happens one side of the bone is slightly cracked, while the other side appears to be normal.

Complete, compound, and stress fractures can occur in both adults and children. A complete fracture happens when the ends of a bone are not touching each other, causing it to split into two parts. Meanwhile, a compound fracture happens when one of both ends of a bone have pushed through the skin. A stress fracture can sometimes only be detected by computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans because they are so subtle that they can hardly be seen.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Rick Coleman+